Accession Number : ADA328808

Title :   Strategic Disharmony: Japan, Manchuria, and Foreign Policy.

Descriptive Note : Research rept.,

Corporate Author : AIR WAR COLL MAXWELL AFB AL

Personal Author(s) : Lucas, David G.

PDF Url : ADA328808

Report Date : APR 1995

Pagination or Media Count : 42

Abstract : On September 18, 1931, Japanese army officers instigated an incident in Manchuria at the town of Mukden. This incident led to Japan's takeover of Manchuria, war with China, and, ultimately, war between the United States and Japan. The story of why and how Japan initiated war with the most populous nation in the world, and then the world's greatest industrial power is replete with contradictions. Japanese foreign policy was formulated through struggles between the civil government and the military establishment. The related national security strategy was developed through struggles between the army and the navy. Once involved in Manchuria, Japan attempted to build a new and allied nation. They set up a puppet government, renamed the state Manchuria, and then conducted a decade-long counterinsurgency campaign designed to consolidate their control of the new acquisition. Again, internal Japanese struggles, this time between their civil authorities and the military leadership, ensured their failure to develop sufficient popular support to mold and hold Manchukuo.

Descriptors :   *MILITARY HISTORY, *MILITARY STRATEGY, *JAPAN, *CHINA, *COUNTERINSURGENCY, *MANCHURIA, MILITARY FORCES(UNITED STATES), FOREIGN POLICY, MILITARY PERSONNEL, WARFARE, UNITED STATES, POLITICAL SCIENCE, NATIONAL SECURITY, LEADERSHIP, MILITARY FORCES(FOREIGN), POWER, CIVIL AFFAIRS.

Subject Categories : Government and Political Science
      Humanities and History
      Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE