Accession Number : ADA331534

Title :   Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings. Volume 409. Fracture-Instability Dynamics, Scaling, and Ductile/Brittle Behavior, 27 November - 1 December 1995, Boston, Massachussets.

Descriptive Note : Conference proceedings

Corporate Author : MATERIALS RESEARCH SOCIETY PITTSBURGH PA

Personal Author(s) : Blumberg Selinger, Robin L. ; Mecholsky, John J. ; Carlsson, Anders E. ; Fuller, Edwin R., Jr

PDF Url : ADA331534

Report Date : 1995

Pagination or Media Count : 402

Abstract : This volume contains the papers that were presented at the 1995 MRS Fall Meeting in Symposium Q, entitled 'Fracture: Instability Dynamics, Scaling, and Ductile/Brittle Behavior.' The purpose of the symposium was to bring together the many communities that investigate the fundamentals of fracture, with special sessions on the ductile/brittle transition, fracture at interfaces, fracture in ceramics and composites, dynamic instabilities in crack propagation, and fractals and scaling in fracture. What was most striking about the symposium was the rich variety of methods that investigators use to model fracture. At the most detailed level, ab initio techniques are used, for instance, to estimate the strength of adhesion at an interface as a function of local structure and composition. At the next level, classical molecular dynamics provide a close up view of a propagating crack in a two- or three-dimensional solid, at least over short length and time scales. Green's function methods provide a way to model the behavior of materials at the atomic scale in the static limit, with zero temperature and strain rate. At the mesoscale, defects such as dislocations may be modeled as point particles (in 2-D) or as line segments (in 3-D) with long-range interactions. The dislocation density may be approximated as a continuous function of position and time, or even treated as an order parameter in a statistical mechanical model. At larger length scales, finite element and continuum models are used to study mixed mode crack propagation, and bond network models are used to represent the behavior of fiber composites.

Descriptors :   *SYMPOSIA, *CERAMIC MATRIX COMPOSITES, *FRACTURE(MECHANICS), *DUCTILE BRITTLE TRANSITION, MATHEMATICAL MODELS, SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPES, FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS, FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITES, ADHESION, TOUGHNESS, STRAIN RATE, CRACK PROPAGATION, SCALING FACTOR, GREENS FUNCTIONS, STATISTICAL MECHANICS.

Subject Categories : Laminates and Composite Materials
      Mechanics
      Optics

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE