Accession Number : ADP001972

Title :   Uptake and Fate of Inhaled Particles and Gases: The Importance of Species Differences,

Corporate Author : HARVARD SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH BOSTON MA DEPT OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND PHYSIOLOGY

Personal Author(s) : Brain,Joseph D. ; Mensah,George A.

Report Date : AUG 1983

Pagination or Media Count : 10

Abstract : This paper discusses the problem of interpreting animal experiments to better predict the potential of an agent to cause damage in humans. Although many species have been used to assess the toxicity of chemicals, and although species differences are both recognized and argued about, we lack a complete and systematic description of the differences among commonly used laboratory animals. The subspecialty of inhalation toxicology is no exception. It is difficult to abstract a comprehensive description of species differences from the literature because so many different kinds of animals and aerosols have been used in various combinations. Several theoretical and experimental contributions exist, but the problem is far from solved. Three aspects of exposure to toxic particles and gases are considered. They are: deposition, clearance, and the magnitude and type of biological response.

Descriptors :   *TOXICOLOGY, *INHALATION, EXPOSURE(PHYSIOLOGY), TOXIC AGENTS, PARTICLES, GASES, TOXICITY, AEROSOLS, LABORATORY ANIMALS, ANATOMICAL MODELS, HUMANS, COMPARISON, PREDICTIONS, DAMAGE, LUNG, RESPIRATORY DISEASES

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE