Accession Number : ADP002161

Title :   Storm Electricity Research in Oklahoma: An Overview,

Corporate Author : NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION NORMAN OK NATIONAL SEVERE STORMS LAB

Personal Author(s) : Rust,W. D. ; Taylor,W. L. ; MacGorman,D. R. ; Arnold,R. T. ; Goodman,S. J.

Report Date : 1983

Pagination or Media Count : 8

Abstract : The National Severe Storms Laboratory and other agencies and institutions have collaborated on storm studies in which electrical and meteorological phenomena are compared and individual lightning characteristics are studied. We have found that lightning is usually associated with higher radar reflectivities from precipitation and often extends downwind from the main updraft into lower reflectivities. Lightning activity appears to be distributed vertically with a bimodal distribution having peaks between about 4-6 and 11-13 km. The upper peak is in lower reflectivities and strongly associated with divergent winds at the top of the storm. Lightning of significant horizontal extent (tens of kilometers) appears to be common in Great Plains storms. In-cloud progression speeds vary during a flash with maximum speeds averaging about 100 km/s. Lightning flashes that lower positive charge to ground may pose unusual threats because they can occur in very weak reflectivities, tend to propagate long distances, usually contain continuing current, have fast risetimes during their return stroke, and appear to have very high peak currents. (Author)

Descriptors :   *Lightning, Oklahoma, Thunderstorms, Flashes, Sound, Measurement, Mapping, Symposia

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE